Good Health Naturally

Natural Health and Food as Medicine Consultant in Sydney



The Most Unhealthy Foods in Your Supermarket part 1

By Sarah Luck on February 12, 2009

The Top 10 Most Unhealthy Foods in Your Supermarket. Part 1

You might want to consider taking the following unhealthy foods off the menu if you want to live a long and healthy life . The food you put into your mouth every day plays a much bigger role in how healthy you are than your genes. 

1. Margarine

The process used to make a liquid oil opaque yellow and spreadable produces an incredibly unhealthy product that hardly qualifies to be called a food. It doesn’t matter if you start with the best quality extra virgin olive, the final product is still an unhealthy food.

Promoted as a cholesterol free and healthier choice than good old butter, margarine is the ultimate source of trans fats, which rather ironically elevate cholesterol and damage blood vessel walls. Even more ironic is the fact that margarine is still recommended by health authorities including the Australian Heart Foundation who also promote reducing dietary trans fats. Clever loopholes in labelling allow margarines to claim that they are ‘virtually’ trans fat free. Margarine is a good example of a politically correct unhealthy food.

What about the new cholesterol lowering margarines?

Save your money, you’ll be getting a dose of the very same phyto sterols by using extra virgin olive oil liberally in your diet. Most fruits and vegetables also contain phyto sterols. Flaxseed or linseed meal, nuts, seeds and legumes are all rich sources of phytosterols.

For a more detailed overview of the processes involved in making margarine, visit the Stop Trans Fats website

For more info on the dangers of trans fats:
Today Tonight Report: The Truth about Trans Fats

2. Breakfast Cereals

These cleverly marketed, attractively boxed ‘foods’ are in my opinion one of the most unhealthy foods in your supermarket.

And it’s not just me who thinks this.

According to Dr. Peter Dingle, a Western Australian Toxicologist and author of “My Dog Eats Better than Your Kids” and “The DEAL for Happier, Healthier, and Smarter Kids”, McDonalds makes a more nutritious breakfast than Cornflakes!

Even Choice Magazine agrees with me. They looked at the top 10 selling children’s breakfast cereals and concluded that you may as well have a candy bar for breakfast they were so high in sugar and lacking in nutrients. Iron man food they most definitely are not.

Besides the addition of sugar and refined salt, breakfast cereals are made from highly processed grains. You might start off with a nice healthy whole grain but by the time you’ve puffed it or turned it into a nice crunchy flake, you’re left with something your body no longer recognises as food. The process used to make the little ‘O’s, pellets, shreds, flakes and other shapes in your cereal bowl is called ‘extrusion’. The extrusion process damages the nutrients and proteins in the grain leaving them devoid of nutrients, highly toxic and not much more than empty calories – watch this space, they will be the trans fats of the future. For more info on the dangers of the extrusion process read Dirty Secrets of the Food Processing Industry by Sally Fallon

3. Refined Vegetable Oils

A diet high in omega 6 polyunsaturated vegetable oils has been linked to an increased risk of:

  • Cancer
    (Escrich E, et al. 2006. Are the olive oil and other dietary lipids related to cancer? Experimental evidence. Clinical and Translational Oncology).
    (Peskin BS, Carter MJ. 2008. Chronic cellular hypoxia as the prime cause of cancer: what is the de-oxygenating role of adulterated and improper ratios of polyunsaturated fatty acids when incorporated into cell membranes? Medical Hypothises.)
  • Melanoma
    (Vinceti M et al. 2005. A population-based case-control study of diet and melanoma risk in northern Italy. Public Health and Nutrition)
  • Learning disorders
  • Allergies
  • Immune suppression
  • Heart disease
  • Atherosclerosis (hardened plaques in your arteries)
  • Reproductive problems

A pretty impressive list for a food we’ve been urged to consume more of for the last 20 years.

Polyunsaturated vegetable oils are highly fragile and easily damaged and subject to rancidity producing huge amounts of free radicals. The refining process also strips them of their natural antioxidants including vitamin E which in turn depletes your body of valuble antioxidants when you eat them.

The only oils in my kitchen include sesame oil, ghee and coconut oil for cooking, olive oil for salad dressings and butter to turn steamed vegetables from boring to mouth watering.

4.Doughnuts

According to Carla Wolper, Nutritionist at the New York Obesity Research Centre, “When it comes to health, the only thing good about them is the hole”.

Break down a doughnut and you’re left with nothing but refined sugar and flour, artificial flavors and partially hydrogenated oil. They’re also loaded with trans fats – hello heart disease, obesity and diabetes.

Despite the fact that they’re about as healthy as a packet of cigarettes, doughnuts are increasingly used in school fundraisers these days. And we wonder why as a society that diabetes and obesity are set to cripple our health care system in the next decade.

Even if you live by the mantra of ‘everything in moderation’, treat doughnuts like rat poison rather than a food.

5. Soft Drinks

Your average can of soft drink contains the equivalent of 10 teaspoons of sugar (about 150 calories) as well as artificial food colours and sulphites. Sulphites are well known triggers of asthma and other allergies. Diet soft drinks are just as unhealthy, artificial sweeteners like aspartame are potent ‘excitotoxins’ to the brain and nervous system and have also been linked to an increased risk of obesity.

Soft drinks are definitely not a ‘soft’ option in the junk food stakes, they increase your risk of osteoporosis, heart disease, obesity and diabetes.

Soft drink are a particularly unhealthy food for children as they are a significant risk factor for impaired calcification of growing bones – you wouldn’t dream of letting your child smoke a cigarette or drink a glass of wine as a ‘special treat’ so it makes no sense that it’s OK to give a child a can of cola as a weekend treat.

According to a report in the medical journal of Australia, “There is much to be gained by reducing children’s intake of soft drinks and little — except excess weight — to be lost”. Not to mention healthier bones and teeth.

The easiest way to stop yourself and your family drinking soft drink is to simply stop buying it. If it’s not in the fridge you can’t drink it.

Sarah Luck
Natural Health Consultant
Sydney
www.TheNaturalHealthHub.com

COMMENTS - 23 Responses

  1. Hello Sarah! “The only oils in my kitchen include sesame oil, ghee and coconut oil for cooking…”
    - Me too! :-)

    Coconut oil is THE IDEAL cooking oil. Because it is 92% saturated, coconut oil is very stable and highly resistant to oxidation and free radical formation. Coconut oil can stay fresh for a VERY long time. Just my two cents.

    Cheers,
    CoconutOilGuy
    http://www.coconut-oil-central.com
    Your Drugstore in a Bottle

  2. Thanks for this list, it confirms a lot of my suspicions! What I would like to know though, is which kitchen oils are the baddies.

    I already use a lot of olive oil, real butter, and coconut oil in my cooking and baking, but still keep sunflower oil around for high heat frying.

    Could you list the “bad oils” and explain a bit more what’s wrong with them?

    Learning to eat better all the time,

    Cheryl

  3. 3. Helen Hekman
    Mar 28th, 2009 at 7:52 pm

    We would like to know about margarine! Some margarines say they are “non-hydrogenated” “trans fat-free”, low in saturated fatty acids and cholesterol, and a source of Omega 3 polyunsaturates. This is different, new and separate from the ‘old’ margarine which many people know is hydrogenated, therefore full of trans fats.

    Is this ‘new’ margarine better? Or are they the same? If it is just as bad, why? My husband needs specific evidence!

    He likes margarine because it is cheaper than butter, but mostly because it is spreadable.

    Do you have a good way to make butter spreadable? We have tried mixing 1 lb butter with 1 cup olive oil, but it still is pretty hard.

  4. Hi, thanks heaps for that list, is there a part 2? I was pretty happy to see we don’t have any of those things in our kitchen except the occasional softdrink (WHOOPS!!!) and cereals. We usually have porridge in winter (which I make according to ‘nourishing traditions’ book) and muesli which I unfortunately have not made myself, and Weet Bix (which I know isn’t a great option). I am assuming home made muesli and porridge are ok? Can you suggest some other good kid-friendly (ie rushing for school) breakfast foods? Other than eggs? My kids love porridge but won’t really eat muesli and we eat eggs like they’re going out of fashion and worry we will go overboard if we have them for breakfast every morning too! Thanks :)

  5. Hi Cheryl,

    When cooking with heat, saturated fats are the safest and healthiest to use. NONE of the atoms of carbon in their carbon-chain share multiple bonds. They are thus more stable and don’t oxidise as readily. Examples of foods containing a greater proportion of saturated fats include coconut oil, butter, ghee, tallow, and suet.

    Monounsaturated fats have ONE (hence the prefix “mono”) pair of carbon atoms in their carbon-chain which share two bonds. This makes them more reactive than saturated fats, since the redundant extra atomic bond can be grabbed by something else, such as oxygen, turning the oil rancid, or oxidising it. This happens more easily under the influence of heat and light. Although the use of saturated fats for frying is much safer and healthier, at a pinch monounsaturated fats would be the only other fat type I would use, and then only for light (pan) frying for a single dish (no second fryings with the same oil). Foods with a large quanity of monounsaturated fat include olive oil, and lard (which has a high saturated fat content too). Good olive oil should come in a dark glass bottle, to protect the oil from light, and so that plastic molecules don’t leach in.

    Polyunsaturated fats have MORE THAN ONE (hence the prefix “poly”) pair of carbon atoms in their carbon-chain which each share two bonds. They may have two, three, or more such double-bond pairs. This makes them extremely reactive to light and heat, and they oxidise very readily. Free radicals, anyone? The widespread use of polyunsaturated oils are the main reason behind the subtle shift towards promoting monounsaturated olive oil, and encouraging people to eat foods rich in anti-oxidants. Polyunsaturated oils include sunflower oil. You should NOT expose it to heat, as by doing so you are damaging it further and creating additional free radicals. I say “further” and “additional”, as the oil is usually exposed to heat as part of factory processing, and usually sits in a brightly lit shop in a clear plastic bottle prior to sale. As a bonus to the oxidising oil, in it you also receive tiny amounts of molecules of the degassing plastic (but that’s another story). Polyunsaturated vegetable oils are also high in Omega-6 essential fatty acids, which can throw your Omega 3 to Omega 6 balance out of whack, which isn’t good. Now don’t write off all polyunsaturated oils. Some polyunsaturated oils are high in Omega 3 essential fatty acids, necessary for proper brain function. These important polyunsaturates come from fish oils (cod-liver oil is particularly good), and from the flax plant (flaxseed or linseed oil). Good healthfood shops know just how fragile these important polyunsaturated oils are, and sell them in dark glass or even metal bottles to exclude light, and store them in a refrigerator to prevent the oil being affected by heat. The better brands will confirm that heat was excluded from all stages of processing.

    With regard to sunflower oil, if it’s organic and the oil is expressed from the seeds in a low heat way, it should be fine to use in moderation in salads or cold dishes, as long as you take care of it: in a dark glass bottle and kept away from heat. Whatever you do though, for your health’s sake, stop frying with it!

  6. Hi Cheryl,

    When cooking with heat, saturated fats are the safest and healthiest to use. They are more stable and don’t oxidise as readily. Examples of foods containing a greater proportion of their total fat content in saturated form include the likes of coconut oil, butter, ghee, tallow, and suet.

    Monounsaturated fats (e.g. olive oil) are less safe, and Polyunsaturated fats (e.g. sunflower oil) are the most susceptible to harmful oxidisation under the effects of heat and light. The media encourages people to consume anti-oxidants, but it makes even more sense not to to ingest harmful oxidised oils in the first place!

    Polyunsaturated oils, including sunflower oil, should NOT be used for frying. By subjecting it to high heat, you are damaging it further and creating additional free radicals. I say “further” and “additional”, as the oil is usually exposed to heat as part of factory processing, and usually sits in a brightly lit shop in a clear plastic bottle prior to sale. As a bonus to promoting oxidisation, in it you also receive tiny amounts of molecules of the degassing plastic (but that’s another story). Polyunsaturated vegetable oils are also high in Omega-6 essential fatty acids, which can throw your Omega 3 to Omega 6 balance out of whack, which isn’t good.

    Don’t write off all polyunsaturated oils though. Some are high in Omega 3 essential fatty acids, necessary for proper brain function. These important polyunsaturates come from fish oils (cod-liver oil is particularly good), and from the flax plant (flaxseed or linseed oil). Good healthfood shops know just how fragile these important polyunsaturated oils are, and sell them in dark glass or even metal bottles to exclude light, and store them in a refrigerator to prevent the oil being affected by heat. The better brands will be aware and the packaging will mention that heat was excluded from all stages of processing.

    With regard to sunflower oil, if it’s organic and the oil is expressed from the seeds in a low heat way (e.g. “stone ground”), it should be fine to use in moderation in salads or cold dishes, as long as you store it carefully: in a dark glass bottle and kept away from heat. Whatever you do though, for your health’s sake, stop frying with it!

  7. Hi Sarah,
    Is muesli ok for cereal?
    What else are good alternatives for breaky?
    Thanks,
    Helen.

  8. For breakfast, try eating eggs and Ezekiel bread, for example “egg in a hole” or “egg in a basket” (egg fried inside a hole cut in a slice of bread) is fun and tasty. Cooked (preferably soaked) whole grain cereal is okay, such as oatmeal, buckwheat kasha, etc. with good fat. Fruit and kefir or whole milk yogurt smoothies are okay. Some people do better with just a “light” breakfast of raw fruit only, but that is not for everyone.

    Or, do as Asians sometimes do, eat non-breakfast foods for breakfast. For example, I used to steam a head of broccoli to eat on top of my oatmeal and butter. Rice porridge with chicken or fish.

    As far as “spreadable” butter vs. margarine goes, you can store butter in a covered dish at room temperature as long as you go through it at a reasonable rate. Unless it’s very cold in your house, the butter should be soft and spreadable. Obviously that won’t work if one stick sits there for 2 months but if you go through approx. 1 stick a week, for example, that’s fine. Or, if you prefer, you could have a bowl at room temperature containing mixed butter and olive oil, or mixed butter and coconut oil.

  9. Are you sure that breakfast cereals are highly toxic?

  10. Just stumbled upon this (using StumbleUpon) and was surprised to find it was a local article. Peter Dingle was one of my tutors at uni!

    Anyway, cereals. Are the “wholegrain” fruit and flake cereals (like Uncle Toby’s Plus range or Light & Tasty) any better than Froot Loops or Rice Bubbles? I know they’re packed with sugar, they would never taste as good otherwise, but I’d like to think they’re marginally better. Nothing else fills me up in the morning as effectively (even bacon and eggs!)

  11. this article was informational to a point, however, it left me with a lot of questions. for example i use smart balance “butter”. good? bad?

    i use vegetable oil. good? bad? there should have been a list of certain items stated as good or bad. whole oatmeal?
    muesli? the sarah luck left too much open for question.

  12. great article, but it would be even more awesome if you had mentioned a few alternatives, maybe one for margarine at least :)
    thanks for the info!

  13. how about an alternative for margarine? There is just so much fat in butter, I hate to use it.

    Are you going to include mayonnaise on this list? Because I have to say… I think that’s the most unhealthy food ever.

  14. Thanks for the great advice. Crazy how much sugar can be in some of those cereals.

  15. This makes me sad - I am terribly allergic to coconut oil!

  16. Some good alternatives to margarine are:
    *Avocado spread (guacamole).
    *Hummous (chickpea dip)
    *Eggplant dip (baba ganoush)
    *Tahini, nut butters
    *Skordalia (garlicky potato dip-yummy!!) http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/848/skordalia+potato+and+garlic+dip
    *Aioli (garlic mayo- totally addictive!) http://www.davidlebovitz.com/archives/2009/07/aioli_garlic_mayonnaise_recipe.html
    Butter mixed with Olive Oil & Coconut Oil (in a mini food processor), turns out very spreadable, & very good for you!

  17. Anyone questioning the pros and cons of unsaturated vs saturated fat should read this article on the Weston A Price website: http://www.westonaprice.org/knowyourfats/skinny.html

    In particular, related to “commercial” oils, be sure to read the section called Modern Methods of Processing Fats. These oils are heat treated, deodorized and even bleached to make them “acceptable” for sale!

    Personally, I use coconut oil and butter with a little olive oil at the end of the cooking process. If any oil smokes it should not be used as it’s a sign that the oil is damaged!

  18. Helen - double check the labels on margarine, I think you’ll find that they say “virtually trans fat free”, slightly different from “trans fat free”. The issue with the newer margarines is the oils they are made from - cheap, nasty and refined - which is why they’re cheaper than butter. If the oil is damaged and oxidised, the final product is damaging to your health. When you look at the degree of processing involved in the production of margarine - the expensive equipment and the people that must be employed to man this equipment and it’s still cheaper than butter which is made simply by churning cream and adding a little bit of salt - you have to wonder about the quality of the oils used! Even more of a wonder when you consider the costs in growing the seed crops for the oil, harvesting them and transporting them to be processed into oils and then made into margarine!

    For years doctors and nutritionists urged us all to choose cholesterol free margarine over butter. We now know that these old hydrogenated margarines interfered with a key enzyme in cholesterol metabolism and actually increased cholesterol as a result even though they where 100% cholesterol free. Damaged oils result in free radical damage - difficult to measure until it’s too late. Eye problems, high cholesterol, heart disease or an inflammatory disorders (arthritis etc) are all good signs that free radical damage is rife in the body.

    The cholesterol lowering margarines are a complete waste of hard earned money - you’ll get exactly the same ‘plant sterols’ using extra virgin olive oil in your salads and eating nuts, seeds and fresh fruits and vegetables plus a vast array of other plant chemicals, vitamins and minerals not found in these margarines.

  19. Katie - Butter and Margarine both contain the same amount of ‘fat’. Margarine is just liquid oil. The difference is in the quality of the fats and oils. Margarine is made from poor quality and damaged vegetable oils that are damaged even further during the process that turns them from a liquid to a spreadable solid.
    A food technologist who once worked for a company that made margarine told me recently that if anyone ever saw margarine before it was deodorised and coloured that they would never touch it again. Apparently the stink is pretty horrible.
    If mayonaisse is made with good quality oils, it’s actually a very healthy food - great for healthy cells and a healthy brain). Egg yolks are rich in DHA (the same fatty acid found in fish oils), vitamin d, iron, zinc etc etc. The best way to ensure healthy mayo is to make your own (fortunately it’s easy to make - watch this space and I’ll post a recipe soon).

  20. Manda - my main goal with this article was to get people questioning what they put in their mouths and not believe everything they’re told by food manufacturers. Being left with more questions is great (although often frustrating at the time)!! It was being in this same situation myself that started me on my journey - and I can still remember how angry, frustrated, confused and overwhelmed I felt at the time when I started to questionn what I had been told, taught, practiced and ate. You now need to research and find answers to those questions. This is how life enhancing changes are made. Don’t accept anything anyone tells you without first questioning it.
    It would take a whole book to classify every food and every brand as good vs bad. In fact I prefer to classify food on a scale from SAD (standard Australian diet), bronze, silver, gold and platinum rather than simply good or bad. If someone simply tells you the answer, you’ll never be able to make an informed and educated opinion when faced with other foods (or products).
    Maybe you can outline some of your questions and myself and others can help to answer them.

  21. Belinda - Are you aware of Peter Dingles book “My Dog Eat’s Better Than Your Kids”? Fantastic book that I often reccomend clients purchase. I’ve never had the good fortune of actually meeting Dr Dingle (yet) but I love his work.

    Alas, I’m sure you already know the answer to your questions. ‘Wholegrain’ breakfast cereals are no healthier. “Wholegrain” is the current “Low Fat”, “Light” and “Diet” used for marketing and advertising unhealthy products to consumers. Consumers have cottoned on that these terms are highly misleading. I’ve even recently noticed that sugar is listed on the ingredients panel as ‘natural cane sugar’ to make it sound healthier! The inclusion of the sugar and salt in these cereals is bad enough but the processing of the lovely healthy wholegrains damages the carbohydrates, fats and proteins they contain. If the grains are puffed, pellets, “O” shapes or nice crunchy flakes then they’ve been through the damaging extrusion process.
    Instead eat wholegrains in their wholegrain form and make your breakfast from whole rolled oats, rye, millet etc (make them into a porridge, bircher mueslie or mueslie). Try a rice congee from brown basmatic rice or quinoa. Add some dried organic fruit to it or grate an apple in while serving to sweeten the taste. Allow your tastebuds some time to adjust to the change as well.

  22. David
    I’m quite sure that breakfast cereals are a very nasty product ill deserving of being called a ‘food’ (and as my article points out I’m not alone in this sentiment). It’s not just the damage done to the grains but the fact that breaking your fast in the morning with a sugar laden meal that provides nothing but empty calories, a bit of fibre and few token nutrients will set your metabolism up to crave sugary junk foods for the rest of the day. It will also leave you more susceptible to craving stimulants like coffee due to the energy crashes that result from these high sugar foods. Why not try a “2 week No Breakfast Cereal Challenge” and have a poached egg and rye toast, porridge (from rolled oats, not instant oats) or good quality mueslie with some sheeps milk yoghurt and observe the difference in your energy levels, concentration and ability to choose healthy foods for the rest of the day. Let me know how you go.

  23. Cheryl - Use your coconut oil or ghee for high heat frying, not sunflower oil. Saturated fat or oil (ghee or coconut oil) is very stable and not damaged by high temperatures. Monounsaturated oils are less stable and damaged by very high heat (such as frying) while polyunsaturated oils are extremely fragile and are damaged even by exposure to light and oxygen. Damaged oils contain free radicals. Free radicals literally cause your body to rust from the inside out and damage cells including blood vessel walls, eyes etc. Avoid all oils sold in clear containers not matter what the oil is (light damages oil) - the exception to this is coconut oil. Avoid all polyunsaturated oils unless they come in nitrogen flushed opaque containers and are stored in the frigde - discard them 4 weeks after opening (oxygen gets in and damages the oil). This is why any oil or margarine made from polyunsaturated oils or containing polyunsaturated are dangerous. Hope this helps.

  24. We very rarely have Coca Cola in the house, if the kids drink it they go hyperactive for hours.

    Me, I’ll just stick to the Porridge for breakfast, rather than McDonalds.

  25. My dear people.

    I’m truly sorry to find yourselves in such a situation of confused so called “proper nutritional education” state.
    I think this is nothing else but business. This is a mirror image to what the Western medicine do, only this time they go against the Western medicine and to some degree the so called the Wholistic medicine, or natural medicine. At the end of the day it all leads and ends as a business to some as it usually is . The one’s who are at the receiving end is us, the suckers - consumers.
    Just see how big the people from the island countrise are? I trust it is because among other things they consume a lot of Coconut oil because it is plentyfull, and they’ve used it for so long.
    Take any oil for that matter, butter, ghee, coconut oil, tahini even, they are all saturated oils. For decades the health proffesionals were educating us that saturated oils are bad for us. They were saying every oil/fat that solidifies in room temprature it is saturated fat and it’s bad for the health.
    Take the people of the Mediterranean countries, they are among the healtiest long living people on Earth.
    They all eat, cook, fry, in olive oil, but they are among the healthiest and longest living people on Earth.
    All I’d like to say is, I’m not medicaly educated person, but I graduated from the University of Hard Knocks which beats the hell out of the so called nutrition proffesionals who are nothing else but a ill mannered merchants dealing business with us all. They seem to find something new every day, and if what the’ve found was proven to be a mistake, or been wrong about it, they quickly cover it up with an excuse. Isn’t this a clever merchant style of doing business???
    Anyhow, I must sign off as I’m going to cook some “goulash” today, with a very little bit of organicaly grown and fed red beef, naturally spiced with hungarian paprika and bay leaf and all kinds of vegies cooked slowly and a lot of passion.

    To your health.

  26. I wonder if we really know about which type of oil to use in frying? My grandmothers used LARD, and churned BUTTER. They both lived to be in their middle 80’s, their husbands lived until almost 90 years old. None of them were sick until the very end of their lives……makes you wonder, huh?

  27. 27. wanda cunningham
    Jul 25th, 2009 at 4:21 pm

    Just use Lard for frying just like my grandmother who lived to be in her middle 80’s, never was sick…

  28. I think that often the point of breakfast cereals is to encourage kids and adults to drink milk which, nutritionally, is just as important (if not more) than the nutrients you claim cereals are devoid of. Most people will not realistically avoid all the foods you mention or substitute them with some of the alternative other readers have suggested. It tales a special kid to eat hummus instaed of butter. Nuturionally, I think the cereal battle is not worth fighting when there are so many more dangerous food choices people make everyday out of convenience and simple economics. Breakfast cereal, while not perfect, is far better than other choices people could be making and making people feel guilty for eating it because it is super-processed is not a helpful discourse.

  29. Wonderful article and even better discussions going on, love it.

    We use Smart Balance Lite with Flax seed oil currently and I use Extra Virgin Olive Oil for everything. I am sadly allergic to every kind of tree nut and coconut so I cannot use Coconut oil; I am not allergic to peanuts as they are a legume. A little sidenote: My trip to Hawaii years ago was fabulous except all the yummy stuff (that was bad for me anyway) had Macadamia nuts or coconut in it! haha

    I work from home, homeschool my eight year old little girl, and I am constantly doing research. We eat healthy - she loves healthy food, loves trying new foods - but I am always looking for ways to improve things. We do our best not to eat past 7pm at night, we (try to) make sure to get at least 8 hours of sleep each night, and we stay clear of fried/fast food.

    One of the things my daughter and I used to do for breakfast was Egg-in-a-Hole. We no longer buy bread though, we use flour tortillas instead, so I have taken to hard boiling the eggs and having one with oatmeal and a DanActive drinkable yogurt. We also do shredded wheat cereal at times. Eggos were fast and easy and probably horrible so we stopped eating them except for the occasional treat; my daughter loves Multi-Grain blueberry Eggos waffles with Smart Balance peanut butter.

    Anyway, I know there is room for improvement but we eat better than most I think. I would love to find Ezekiel bread here and I am getting back to cooking large batches of food on the weekend to freeze into meals so we aren’t so tempted to order in Chinese or go out.

    Thank you for posting this! Found you via Suzy Cohen.

  30. While many people are aware of these bad foods, they don’t take action to stop using them. Good post. A good reminder.

    Rita blogging at The Survive and Thrive Boomer Guide http://boomersurvive-thriveguide.typepad.com

  31. 31. Robert Bond
    Jul 26th, 2009 at 6:54 am

    Hi, Sarah!

    We have been using olive oil for high heat frying, so this is no good. Can we use peanut oil or corn oil for the frying since peanut and corn are more stable? Thanks!

    Rob

  32. 32. Marshmellow
    Jul 27th, 2009 at 6:17 am

    I justed throw this in: a good way to keep your butter spreadable is with a butter bell. You leave it out, so your butter stays room temperature, spreadable, and fresh. I lived in France for a while; they didn’t even keep the butter in a container, just open and on the counter,

  33. Howdy! Have you heard of Professor Brian Peskin?

    He is the world expert on “Parent Essential Oils” or as most people call them “EFA’s” - essential fatty acids.

    His website is ==>brianpeskin.com

    He was on the Saturday information call in January which was recorded.

    Here is the link if you have time to listen - http://tinyurl.com/brianpeskin

    We share research from Nobelists every Saturday and there are a few links to past calls on my website.

    Serrapeptase does an amazing job helping with all forms of “Inflammation” and dissolving blood clots and arterial plaque.

    In good health!
    Harry

  34. It is ironic that I grew up on a steady diet of all the above and yet none of these items reside in my kitchen. I remember eating cinnamon and white sugar poured liberally over margarine soaked white bread toast and Cap’t Crunch with Coke for breakfast. I bet white bread was a near miss for the list. I love that suet and dried beef, yum!

  35. 35. cathy mifsud
    Jul 30th, 2009 at 8:27 pm

    Hey Ana Maria

    A deliciously healthy (addictive!) breakfast is raw milk kefir (extra cream if you can find it raw) one whole raw organic free range egg, one ripe banana, level teaspoon raw honey (or to your liking) and a teaspoon virgin coconut oil, pinch nutmeg and or real vanilla. Blended into a milk shake.

    This is heaven, jam packed with nutrition and probiotics. Excellent for the little ones too.

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